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Radar On Market Access: COVID-19 Pandemic Drives Home Infusion Utilization

Posted by Angela Maas on May 21, 2020

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With numerous hospitals focused on the COVID-19 pandemic and many areas under stay-at-home mandates, home infusion is more important than ever. Changes within the industry already have been seen, and the current situation is likely to result in permanent shifts within the home infusion space, AIS Health reported.

"If you can do infusion at home, you need to do it there," maintains Ashraf Shehata, KPMG national sector leader for Healthcare & Life Sciences. "This is about controlling infection risk in the near term, and many home infusion candidates are in a high-risk category. Longer term, there has been a shift toward delivering care in the most economical and clinically appropriate setting, largely driven by payers."

"We have seen an increase in some home infusion utilization of select therapies in certain markets where patient administration sites of care are shifting from the acute care or hospital outpatient setting to the home, related to the pandemic," says Drew Walk, CEO of Soleo Health.

Some plans already have been shifting administration of certain therapies to patient homes and provider offices, which are more cost-effective settings than hospitals, points out Elan Rubinstein, Pharm.D., EB Rubinstein Associates.

"There could be more home infusion, with drugs that pose low risk of serious adverse events during or immediately after infusion or where a patient tolerated prior infusions of these drugs with no or minimal difficulty," says Rubinstein.

Lisa Kennedy, Ph.D., chief economist and managing principal at Innopiphany LLC, points out that while CMS has changed some policies in support of home infusion, "not everyone is on board." She notes that the Community Oncology Alliance "has raised safety concerns about home infusion centered on a lack of training of those in the community administering treatment at home versus trained oncology nurses."

"Going forward there will be a lot of candidates for home infusion, and some customers/patients may like the convenience of getting care at home," says Shehata. "There might be opportunities for alternative care models to be introduced here. The ability for nurses to teach patients how to self-administer the medicines is an important facet to this."


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Topics: Industry Trends, Data & Analytics, Provider, Payer